• P
    peadar

    I recently purchased an Android phone and now have semi-permanent retina damage.

    However, just before the i completely lost my marbles, i installed an App called "Torque"
    After connecting it to my cheap ebay elm327 OBD interface on my car, i was presented with some wonderful dials and a way to upload my car's ECU data to the interweb.

    So i thought to meself, "hey, i could send it to mango!" and there was born unto me an idea.

    And so now, mango now emails me on certain conditions...over-speed (yes really!!) average fuel consumption too low and a host more i'm working on. like a weekly report.
    I'm working on a kind of geofence idea to email me when i go through the toll bridge too as i've been overcharged from time to time. (it's a camera system they use...and i have a very generic car...grrr)

    Well, thats just another use i've found for Mango. Maybe it can fuel some good ideas. pardon the pun :-)

    Peadar

    posted in Stories read more
  • P
    peadar

    I'd like to share a little work-around my buddy and i discovered whilst developing a certain project.

    We use mango for our SCADA environment and especially love the flexibility of it.

    This is shown out in the way we use the nmea listener.

    PROJECT:
    We needed a way to parse a comma separated sentance from a self built board and micro-processor (16fxxx for the nerds out there)
    Well, the nmea listener did the trick, but then out in the field it proved a little difficult as rs232 doesn't really like a 15 mile cable!

    So we packaged it up with a modem and sent it via GPRS on, well, lets say TCP port 5555

    We then installed a piece of free software (see below) to forward the TCP message to a Virtual Serial Port - COM6.

    And...as you can see from the attached screenshots, it worked pretty well

    SOFTWARE:
    Mango (of course!)
    Virtual Serial Port Emulator from www.eterlogic.com (free for 32bit platform)
    Install the software and create a new 'connector' (er...com port) set it with defaults and tick the 'emulate baud rate' box.
    Then create a 'TCP Server'. Enter the TCP port you want the Server to listen on. Then choose the newly created serial port and in serial port settings, choose 19,200 baud and leave rest as default.
    Initialize the new 'Devices' and send some data.
    Create your NMEA listener as a data source in Mango and listen for data. With any luck, you should see some data coming in.

    THINGS TO WATCH OUT FOR:
    The NMEA listener is limited to 9600 baud. Thats fine, but your COM Port must be set to at least double that (19,200) for mango to hear your transmission.
    I don't know the exact reason, maybe someone else could offer an explanation.
    Don't 'enable' the NMEA data source in mango if you're trying to listen to test data. It will hog the serial port. I'm sure you know that, but it took me while to figure !!

    I hope someone finds this useful. After all we've benefited so much from this resource.

    njoy

    posted in How-To read more
  • P
    peadar

    hi guys, (er and gals...:-o )

    i was wondering is there any way that the NMEA listener can run at a higher baud rate?
    It seems limited to 9600 and i need it to go to 19,200...

    has anyone any suggestions?

    regards

    posted in User help read more
  • P
    peadar

    Did you ever want to display feed from Yahoo Pipes?

    In my case, i show a Google Map of a vehicle's position in relative realtime
    The reason for this is that i am monitoring a bunch of data being relayed from a truck and wanted to display its position in realtime, on a map in the same webpage.

    Yahoo Pipes handles the KML data from my GPS Tracking Software, providing a live feed.

    I imagine you can display any Yahoo Pipes feed, its just i use the KML feature.

    this is a demo link i put up for all to see:
    http://limcoco.dyndns.org:9090/public_view.htm?viewId=4

    if you'd like to know more, just let me know and i'll post some sample code.

    Ps. remember please that i'm a bit of a novice, and there is probably a much simpler way of achieving what i've done here. :-)

    posted in How-To read more
  • P
    peadar

    First off i'd like to say i was a complete novice when i downloaded the package, but was up and running within weeks.

    This is what we've accomplished so far:

    We've succesfully installed a datalogger in test mode which will eventually be mounted on a vehicle to monitor various temperature readings, pressure sensors, and pulse counters.
    This data will be given to the driver in a live graphical format
    We're using a datataker DT80 for the job.

    From there we've fed all this info into Mango through ModBUS IP, which then pushes the data out through a GPRS connection to a second Instance of Mango at the depot.

    Administration at the Depot can then view a live display of the truck's activities and job reference.

    Also on the recieving end, the data is parsed through Advanced Data Logger which puts the history into a MSSQL database for later analysis.

    I'd like to know if Mango can put the Data into a MSSQL database itself, but for now, the Advanced logger does the job nicely.

    Hats off to you guys...this is an exceptional piece of software...
    It was easy to install, configure, and use...
    only once in a while do you come across something as flexible and intuitive as this...Well Done!!

    I'll keep you posted as to how the live install goes in April

    posted in Stories read more
  • P
    peadar

    I recently purchased an Android phone and now have semi-permanent retina damage.

    However, just before the i completely lost my marbles, i installed an App called "Torque"
    After connecting it to my cheap ebay elm327 OBD interface on my car, i was presented with some wonderful dials and a way to upload my car's ECU data to the interweb.

    So i thought to meself, "hey, i could send it to mango!" and there was born unto me an idea.

    And so now, mango now emails me on certain conditions...over-speed (yes really!!) average fuel consumption too low and a host more i'm working on. like a weekly report.
    I'm working on a kind of geofence idea to email me when i go through the toll bridge too as i've been overcharged from time to time. (it's a camera system they use...and i have a very generic car...grrr)

    Well, thats just another use i've found for Mango. Maybe it can fuel some good ideas. pardon the pun :-)

    Peadar

    posted in Stories read more
  • P
    peadar

    I'd like to share a little work-around my buddy and i discovered whilst developing a certain project.

    We use mango for our SCADA environment and especially love the flexibility of it.

    This is shown out in the way we use the nmea listener.

    PROJECT:
    We needed a way to parse a comma separated sentance from a self built board and micro-processor (16fxxx for the nerds out there)
    Well, the nmea listener did the trick, but then out in the field it proved a little difficult as rs232 doesn't really like a 15 mile cable!

    So we packaged it up with a modem and sent it via GPRS on, well, lets say TCP port 5555

    We then installed a piece of free software (see below) to forward the TCP message to a Virtual Serial Port - COM6.

    And...as you can see from the attached screenshots, it worked pretty well

    SOFTWARE:
    Mango (of course!)
    Virtual Serial Port Emulator from www.eterlogic.com (free for 32bit platform)
    Install the software and create a new 'connector' (er...com port) set it with defaults and tick the 'emulate baud rate' box.
    Then create a 'TCP Server'. Enter the TCP port you want the Server to listen on. Then choose the newly created serial port and in serial port settings, choose 19,200 baud and leave rest as default.
    Initialize the new 'Devices' and send some data.
    Create your NMEA listener as a data source in Mango and listen for data. With any luck, you should see some data coming in.

    THINGS TO WATCH OUT FOR:
    The NMEA listener is limited to 9600 baud. Thats fine, but your COM Port must be set to at least double that (19,200) for mango to hear your transmission.
    I don't know the exact reason, maybe someone else could offer an explanation.
    Don't 'enable' the NMEA data source in mango if you're trying to listen to test data. It will hog the serial port. I'm sure you know that, but it took me while to figure !!

    I hope someone finds this useful. After all we've benefited so much from this resource.

    njoy

    Attachment: download link

    posted in How-To read more
  • P
    peadar

    hi guys, (er and gals...:-o )

    i was wondering is there any way that the NMEA listener can run at a higher baud rate?
    It seems limited to 9600 and i need it to go to 19,200...

    has anyone any suggestions?

    regards

    posted in User help read more
  • P
    peadar

    here's 2 screens from a current project.
    not the best artistically, but you get the idea :-)

    hope that helps

    Peadar

    Attachment: download link

    posted in Stories read more